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Patente

  1. Erweiterte Patentsuche
VeröffentlichungsnummerUS3693313 A
PublikationstypErteilung
Veröffentlichungsdatum26. Sept. 1972
Eingetragen29. Juli 1970
Prioritätsdatum29. Juli 1970
Auch veröffentlicht unterCA970671A1, DE2137751A1
VeröffentlichungsnummerUS 3693313 A, US 3693313A, US-A-3693313, US3693313 A, US3693313A
ErfinderSexstone John H
Ursprünglich BevollmächtigterBrown & Williamson Tobacco
Zitat exportierenBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Externe Links: USPTO, USPTO-Zuordnung, Espacenet
Cigarette paper tube manufacture
US 3693313 A
Zusammenfassung
In the manufacture of spills of cigarette paper for use in the manual making of filter cigarettes, apparatus is provided for initially forming a web of cigarette paper into a hollow tube. The formed tube is flattened and then cut in predetermined lengths to form spills to be used with a manual cigarette making machine. The web has a tipping part. A photocell arrangement is operable to sense the location of the tipping part in relation to the cutting of the tube to assure cutting along the center line of the tipping part as well as along a line centrally located between tipping parts. In order that there be proper registration of the tipping part in relationship to such cutting, the photocell arrangement is designed to adjust the speed of movement of a cutting knife. The cut spills are then picked up by a separating conveyor traveling at a higher speed to space the spills from one another. The spaced cut spills are then directed against a stop plate after having been deformed slightly by the separating conveyor to impart rigidity thereto. The spills are deposited on a collecting conveyor which transfers the spills substantially parallel to one another and in a direction substantially normal to the path of travel of the paper tube. A spacing gate cooperates with the collecting conveyor to collect the spills and then permits only a predetermined number thereof to pass therethrough to a spill bundling assembly. A banding assembly is designed to sever a length of banding material from a web. The severed band is then secured about the collected spills located at the bundling assembly. The banded bundle of spills are discharged and then placed in a kit designed to permit a cigarette smoker to manually make a filter tip cigarette.
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Beschreibung  (OCR-Text kann Fehler enthalten)

limited States alteitt Sexstone [54] CIGARETTE PAPER TUBE MANUFACTURE [72] Inventor: John H. Sexstone, Middletown, Ky.

[73] Assignee: Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation, Louisville, Ky.

[22] Filed: I July'29, 1970 [21] Appl. No.: 59,052

[52] US. Cl. ..53/3, 53/23, 53/61,

53/123, 53/148, 53/198 R, 93/1 C, l31/2l B, 131/94 [51] Int. Cl. ..A24c 5/46, A24c 5/52, B65b 19/34 [58] Field of Search ..53/59, 61, 78, 123,148, 177, 53/198 R, 3, 23; 93/1 C, 77 FT, 82 131/21 R, 21 A-21 D, 63, 64, 94

Primary Examiner'l"heron E. Condon Assistant Examiner-Neil Abrams Attorneyl(ane, Dalsimer, Kane, Sullivan and Kurucz [57] ABSTRACT In the manufacture of spills of cigarette paper for use in the manual making of filter cigarettes, apparatus is [451 Se t. 26, 1972 provided for initially forming a web of cigarette paper into a hollow tube. The formed tube is flattened and then cut in predetermined lengths to form spills to be used with a manual cigarette making machine. The web has a tipping part. A photocell arrangement is operable to sense the location of the tipping part in relation to the cutting of the tube to assurecutting along the center line of the tipping part as well as along a line centrally located between tipping parts. in order that there be proper registration of the tipping part in relationship to such cutting, the photocell ar rangement is designed to adjust the speed of movement of a cutting knife. The cut spills are then picked up by a separating conveyor traveling at a higher speed to space the spills from one another. The spaced cut spills are then directed against a stop plate after having been deformed slightly by the separating conveyor to impart rigidity thereto. The spills are deposited on a collecting conveyor which transfers the spills substantially parallel to one another and in a direction substantially normal to the path of travel of the paper tube. A spacing gate cooperates with the collecting conveyor to collect the spills and then permits only a predetermined number thereof to pass therethrough to a spill bundling assembly. A banding assembly is designed to sever a length of banding material from a web. The severed band is then secured about the collected spills located at the bundling assembly. The banded bundle of spills are discharged and then placed in a kit designed to permit a cigarette smoker to manually make a filter tip cigarette.

35 Claims, 31 Drawing Figures PATENTEDsms m2 sum 02 or 14 v INVENTVO'R var/xv H. SEXSTONE T ATTORNEYS P'A'TENTEDsEm m2 SHEET 03 0F 14 as y mN UE mm 0E ATTORNEYS PATENTED8EP26 I972 sum as or 14 8 INVENTOR JOHN h. SEXSfU/Vf BY a! la Ix) ATTOR NEYS P'A'TENTEDsms m2 SHEET DBUF 14 FIG. I!

44 FIG. [3

. INVENTOR a/m/ h. 55%5704 5 7 BY 444 M, 4-: m 74. 2

I ATTORNEYS PATENTEDSEPz i912 3.693. 3 1 3 SHEET [18 [1F 14 FIG. 16

I 4 III,

INVENTOR JOHN ff SEXS TO/VE BY fl Wm ATTORNEYS PKTENTEBSEHI IW'Z 3.693.313

SHEET USOF 14 INVENTOR- /0///V H. SEXSTO/VE ATTO R N EYS P'A'TEmEnsms m2 3.693.313

sum 10UF14 1 FIG. I9 230% F} "I l I YZQ QF I 1 1 3) Q i n i/ A 224 MLULJJJJLUM 5 E55 5.2 -3

INVENTOR JOHN H- SE/YJTO/VE ATTOR NEYS PATENTED SE? 26 I972 SHEET lZUF 14 FIG. 2/

P 3 1 INVENTOR ua/m/ H. SEA/STONE ATTORNEYS PATENTED EPz I 1 3.6 93.313

SHEET 1 3 OF 14 BY a4 7 ATTORNEYS PNENYEDSEPZS m2 3, 93,313

sum 1n HF 14 FIG. 25A

INVENTOR JOHN SE/YSTO/VE ATTORNEYS a. CIGARETTE PAPER TUBE MANUFACTURE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This application. relates to the manufacture of spills designed to be used in the manufacture of filter tip cigarettes by manual techniques of the type disclosed in U-.S. Pat. No. 3,491,768 granted Jan. 27, 1970. The

machine of that patentis designed to make a filter tip cigarette manually. by inserting a filter plug and a charge of tobacco simultaneously into a preformed tube. This tube includes atipping part which may assume the form of simulated cork at the filter tip end of the manually made cigarette. This preformed tube is commonly referred to as a spill in the trade. In accordance with accepted marketing practice, these spills are supplied tothe smoking consumer as part of a kit which'may include the filter plugs, a supply of tobacco, co, a manual cigarette making machine (as part of the initial purchase by the consumer), and a number of packages forthe manually made filter tip cigarettes.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION posed thereon.

A further object is to automatically collect a predetermined number of the spills and, thereafter, bundle and band the spills for eventual placement in the kit-for manually making filter tip cigarettes.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent from the following detailed-description which is to be taken in conjunctionwith the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION THE DRAWINGS In the accompanying drawings:

FIG. 1 is a. diagrammatic top plan view of the cigarette paper tube making machine;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary top plan view of the web of cigarette paper drawn to scale and showing the relative location of the cork tipping;

FIG. 3 is a schematic perspective view illustrating the several operations performed in handling cigarette paper in forming it into a tube which is eventually cut at preset locations and the cut spills bundled and banded for ultimate disposition;

FIG. 4 is a diagrammatic perspective view of the cigarette paper tube forming machine;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged elevational view of the photocell assembly for sensing the cork tipping of the web of cigarette paper viewed in the direction of the arrows 5-5 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a side elevational view taken alongthe line 6-6 of this photocell assembly, shown in FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a top plan view of the portion of cigarette paper web passing through the photocell assembly showing the manner in which the photocells sense the cork tipping;-

FIG. 8 is an enlarged side elevational view, viewed in the direction of the arrows 8-8 of FIG. 1, showing the pressure roller station at which the formed and sealed paper tube is flattened;

FIG. 9 is a top plan view taken along the line 9-9 of FIG. .8;

FIG. 10 is a cross sectional view taken along the line 10-10 of FIG. 8 showing the compression of thepaper tube as it passes between the pressure roller;

FIG. 11 is a fragmentary perspective view of the ledger and station at which the flattened paper tube is cut at preset locations;

FIG. 12 is a top plan view of the ledger showing the flattened paper tube out along the central line of the tipping;

FIG. 13 is a similar plan view showing the cutting of the flattened tube intermediate the spaced tipping;

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary perspective view showing the drive of the flattened paper tube cutting knife;

FIG. 15 is a similar fragmentary perspective view of the drive taken from the flattened paper tube cutting knife for permitting the proper timing and sequencing of subsequent stations of the tube making machine;

FIG. 16 isan enlarged elevational view taken along the line 16-16 of FIG. 1 showing the manner in which the cut spills are separated;

FIG. 17 is a top plan view in the direction of the arrows 17-17 of FIG. 16 showing the spaced cut tubes and the manner in which they are then conveyed parallel to one another to the bundling station;

FIG. 18 is an enlarged sectional view taken along the line'l8-l8 of FIG. 17;. 7

FIG; 19 is an elevational view taken along the line 19-19 of FIG. 1 showing the spacing gate designed to accumulate the desired number of spills to be eventually bundledand banded;

- FIG. 20 is a side elevational view taken along the line 20-20 of FIG. 19 showing the accumulation of spills at the spacing gate;

FIG. 21 is an enlarged elevational view partly in section showing the manner in which the accumulated spills are bundled and handed;

FIG. 22 is a sectional view taken along the line 20- 20 of FIG. 21;

FIG. 23 is a sectional view taken along the line 23- 23 of FIG. 21;

FIG. 24 is a schematic view showing an alternate embodiment of cigarette paper tube forming machine wherein the cork tipping is printed on the cigarette paper as it is introduced into the tube forming machine;

FIG. 24a is a plan view taken in the direction of the arrows 24a-24a of FIG. 24;

FIG. 25 is still another alternate embodiment wherein the cork tipping is supplied from a web of such material and cut into predetermined lengths and eventually pasted on the cigarette paper prior to introduction into the tube forming machine;

FIG. 25a is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 25fa-25a of FIG. 25;

FIG. 26 is a section along the line 26-26 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 27 is a section along the line 27-27 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 28 is a section along the line 28-28 of FIG. 4; and

FIG. 29 is a section along the line 29-29 of FIG. 4;

' DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Introduction cutting of the eventually formed and sealed tube. In this connection,-the. web 36 is formed into a sealed tube 44 at the tube forming station 46; and the formed and sealed tube 44 is flattened by the pressure roller assembly 48 prior to cutting of the tubeby the cut-off knife assembly 50, the operation of which is controlled by signals received from the photocell arrangement42 to assure proper registration of the cutting with the location of the filter tipping 40. Thus, the flattened tube is cut into spills 52 having filter tipping at one end thereof. The formed spills are separated lengthwise from one another by the separator conveyor 54. This conveyor 54 also shapes the spills 52 to impart some degree of rigidity thereto sufficient to withstand impact against the stop plate 56. Inthis manner, the spills are transferred onto a collecting conveyor 58 which'conveys the spills parallel to one anotherand'in a path substantially normal to the path of'travel of the paper tube 44. A spacing gate assembly 60 is associated with the separator conveyor 58'and is operable to collect the spills traveling on the conveyor 58 and permit a predetermined number of spills to pass for eventual bundling and banding and disposition in the manual cigarette making kit discussed in the above. Thus, the predetermined number of spills permitted to pass by the gate assembly 60 are directed to the spill bundling station 62 at which the spills are bundled and-banded by the banding assembly 64 which is associated with the bundling station. The banded bundle of spills 66 are then removed from the cigarette paper .tube forming machine 30 for further processing as part of such kit.

CIGARETTE PAPER SUPPLY The source of cigarette paper 32 includes a suitably journaled roll 34 on which is preprinted cork simulating tipping 40 which, in accordance with a successful embodiment of the invention, is spaced 118mm apart as shown in FIG. 2. The tipping 40 is 50mm long and when out along its center line will produce a filter tip cigarette 84mm long when the cigarette portion of the paper which is l 18mm long is also out along its center line. i

In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 24, the source of cigarette paper 32." also comprises a suitably journaled roll 34, but the paper is unprinted. The cork tipping portion 40' is printed directly on the web 36'. This is accomplished by means of a driven gravure printing roll 70 having a lower portion immersed in a suitable ink supply 72. The roller 70 is furnished with the selected printing pattern spaced at intervals along its circumferentially extending periphery and adapted to print this pattern on the web 36'. The pressure roll 74 cooperateswith the driven printing roll 70 to print the selected length of the tipping portion 40 at spaced intervals on the web 36'. A scrapper 78 operates to remove excess printing ink from the roll 70 and permits only ink to remain in the printing pattern on the drum periphery. The printed pattern 40' onthe web 36' is dried by means of the heater 80 following which the web 36 is placed in contact with the conveyor 38' for initiation of its movement through the tube making machine in accordance with the previously described embodiment.

In the embodiment of FIG. 25, the source of cigarette paper 32" includes a suitably journaled roll 34" which is also unprinted. The tipping portion" is applied by means of preprinted patches suitably secured at the selected intervals on the web 36". The patches 40" are formed by cutting web 82 extending from the roll 84 of preprinted simulated cork. The knife drum 86 cuts the web 82 into suitably dimensioned patches 40"; and the vacuum anvil drum 88 and an eccentric roller 90 cooperate in applying the cut patches 40'. to the web 36" at the selected predetermined intervals. In order toobtain the desired securement of the patches 40" on the web 36", one side of the web 82 may have applied thereto glue by means of the glue pot applicator 92. The web 36" with-the applied patches 40" is then directed to the conveyor 38 and the remainder of the tube making machine 30 as in the previous embodiment.

PAPER CONVEYOR The conveyor'38 operates to impart the necessary movement to the cigarette paper web 36 to draw it from the roll 34 thereafter moving it through the tube forming station 46. This conveyor 38 may be formed of an endless tape extending over a driven drum 102 anda series of rolls 103, 104, 105, 106 and 107. The roll l05-diverts the path of the endless tape 100 to separate it from the paper web 36 at the photocell assembly station 42; but for the most part the tape remains in contact with the'web 36 for drawing it from the roll 34 and aid in passing it through the photocell assembly 42, the tube forming station 46 and the flattening roll assembly 48.

PI-IOTOCELL ASSEMBLY turning of which causes cooperation with a tapped opening 118 in the bracket 112 to facilitate shifting the entire photocell assembly 42 relative to the frame 120.

The photocell 108 operates to detect the leading edge of the tipping part 40 for purposes of generating a signal which is adapted to be compared with the location of the cutting knife assembly 50. The photocell iii) assures the transmission of a signal by the photocell 108 that is in a condition to cause adjustment of the speed of rotation of the cutting knife assembly 50 only when the corktipping part 40 is present. If the cigarette part of the web 36 is present, photocell 108 to cause adjustment of the knife assembly 50," in the manner to bedescribed in detail shortly.

Registryhas been found to be necessary in the case when the .tippingpart 40 is preprinted because of the non-uniform stretching. of the paper during winding and unwinding operation of the paper supplier. In the embodiments of FIG. 24 and FIG. 25, where the tipping part 40 and 40f is respectively printed or applied at the tube forming machine 30 registry may be practiced or desirably for quality control,, but experience has shown that it may not be a problem and may be eliminated. If this election is made, the photocell assembly 42 and means for changing knife speed may be eliminated.

TUBE FORMING ASSEMBLY The tube forming assembly'46 converts the essentially flat paper. web 36 into a formed and sealed tube 44. In this connection, the web 36 is formed about the tube forming rod'124 into a substantially U-shaped cross-sectional configuration as shown in- FIG. 26. Thereafter, an application of glue is applied to one of the inner faces of one of the marginal side edges by the gluer 128 as shown in FIG. 27. The member 130 then cooperates with the tube to complete the formation of tube .by placing the marginal side edges in contact with one another so that the applied glue interposed Pressure Roller Assembly vcircurnferentially extending narrow edge 138 of a width less than that of the flattened cigarette paper tube in order to prevent the creasing of the lateral side edges thereof. See FIG. 10). The roller 136 is suitably journaled on a pivotal arm 140. The pressure which the roller 136 exerts against the cigarette paper tube results from the bias of the spring 142, the effect of which may be controlled by means of the eccentric 144.

Spill Cutting Knife Assembly The knife assembly 50 cuts the flattened tube at predetermined intervals to produce spills 52. Towards this end, the knife is fixed to and. rotates with shaft 152 extending from gear box 154 at an automatically adjustable speed for registry control. Inasmuch as the paper tube 44 is traveling at high speeds, knife 150 is mounted on a universal 155 which permits the knife 150 to be placed at a slight angle to cooperate with and clear surfaces of longitudinally reciprocating ledger 156 as the cut is made. v A cut-off ledger 156 cooperates with knife 150 in cutting the flattened tube. The ledger includes a substantially U-shaped channel 158 which receives and supports the flattened tube during the cutting cycle. A pair of aligned slots 160 and 162 in the side walls of the channel 158 accommodate the cutting edge of the knife 150 as it moves. Ledger 156 traverses alongitudinally reciprocal movement accomplished by mounting the channel 158 on the bracket 164 which, in turn, is supported by the upper ends of a pair of spaced springs 166 and 168 fixed at their respectivebases. The

bracket 164 is connected with a crank mechanism 170. Thus, as the crank mechanism 170 revolves, the bracket 164 and, consequently, the ledger channel 158 reciprocate longitudinally moving along the path of travel of the flattened tube as theintended .cut is made at approximately the same speed as the tube is traveling. Inasmuch as the knife 150 is canted by means of a universal 155, it clears surfaces of the cutting slots 160 and 162. The ledger 156 then returns rearwardly to its starting position to commence another cutting cycle. In this manner, spills 52 are cut from the flattened cigarette paper tube.

Tipping Register Control tipping occurred before the knife cut (knife speedslow), and adjusts the knife speed accordingly.

As shown in FIG. 14, a DC motor 178 changes speed of knife 150 as induced by gear box 180 through the phase shifting differential .182.

The phase shifting differential 182 allows the position of the knife 150 to be shifted in relation to the main machine drive 184 with an input from the DC motor 178.

The phase shifting differential 182 has two inputs one from the main drive 184 and one from the DC motor 178. The gear ratios are such that with: (1) zero DC motor speed, knife speed is maximum and (2) maximum DC motor speed, knife speed is minimum.

The main drive 184 speed is constant; therefore, the speed of the DC motor 182 determines the correct knife speed for registration. The DC motor 182 speed is controlled by the control 174 making decisions from inputs of photocells 108, 110 and 176. In actual practice the knife speed is faster than necessary to hold register in order to avoid braking the motor 182 and reversing its direction. Therefore, the DC-motor is always asked to increase its speed whereby the phase shifting differential subtracts from the knife speed.

Referring to FIG. 2 in which a successful specific embodiment is depicted, a knife cut occurs each 84mm length of paper. The leading edges of cork tipping 40 7 are spaced 168mm apart; Two knife cuts occur within this 168mm span. The control 174 compares the lead ing edgeof knife cut photocell 1'16 with the leading edge of cork tipping photocell 108'o'nly when photocell 110 detects cork tipping 40. This allows the control 174 to ignore the knife cut during the white portion of the paper. When the knife is running too fast, the control 174 senses the knife cut ahead of the cork tipping 40, switches the DC motor 182 to High Speed." During this condition, the control holds the motor'182 in High Speed until the cork tipping 40 is sensed ahead of the knife cut. Then the DC motor 182 is switched to Base Speed. (slow speed allowing the knife speed to increase. When the control 174 is holding register, the DC motor 182 is rapidly switched'between Base? and l-ligh" speeds which .has no effect on knife speed ad-.

justment'.

' PROGRAMMING I A programmer 190 synchronizes the operation of the downstreambundling and handing mechanisms 62 and 64 with the speed of the cutting knife 150. In this connection, the output shaft 192 of gear box 180 continuously rotates and makes one revolution every time the flattened paper tube is cut to individual lengths to produce a spill 52 and in this manner is synchronized with the knife 150. It will be noted that photocell 176 is associated with this shaft 192- in determining the location of knife 150in the cutting cycle. This shaft 192 also drives a reduction gear box 194 which has a l00-l ratio when it is'desired to bundle and band 100 spills 52. The output shaft of the reduction gear box drives the programmer 190.'This programmer includes a gate cylinder timing cam 196a and 196b for the gate 60, a bundle plunger timing cam 198a and 198b for the bundler 62, a band hold timing cam 200 for'the'bandingassembly 64, a band knife timing cam 202a and 202b for the banding assembly 64 and a band heater timing cam 204a'and -204b"for the banding assembly 64. Each cam has a pneumatic three-way valve associated therewith to pneumatically permit the programmed operation in timed sequence asdictated by the timing cams.

I The reduction gear box 194 also trips a switch 205 after the preselected count is reached to index the bundling assembly 62 for reception of another bundler of spills 52.

The input into gear box 180, adjustably by the phase shifting differential 182, serves as the drive for the spill separator conveyor 54. This is accomplished by coupling shaft 206 to drive pulleys 208 and 210 through the respective gear boxes 212 and 214 which serve to increase the rate of rotation of the pulleys relative to shaft 206.

Separator Conveyor The separator conveyor-54 travels at a greater speed than the tube 44 and consequently serves to space he cut spills 52. The separator conveyor 54 includes a pair of lower driven bands 216 and 218-suitably mounted by pulleys and driven by pulley 208; The conveyor 54 also includes an upper band 22.0 on pulleys driven by pulley 210. The leading end of bands 216, 218 and 220 are proximate to one another whereby the cut spills 52 in a flattened condition are readily picked up thereby. The disposition of these belts relative to one another are spills 52 which have been rigidified,striking the stop plate 56 without concern over the impacted ends of the spills being damaged. Upon impact of the spills 52 with the stop plate 56, they are dropped or deposited on the collecting conveyor 58. Plate 222 serves to stop the spills 52in the other direction after hitting plate 56.

Collecting Conveyor The collecting conveyor 58 operates to transfer the flattened spills 52 to the counting and spacing gate 60 for collecting a predetermined number thereof and eventual transfer ofthis number to the bundling assembly 62. The drive for the conveyor 58 is taken off of the shaft 192 extendingfromuthe gear box 180 of the knife assembly 50. As will be observed in FIG. 17, the spills traveling on conveyor 58 are essentially parallel to one'another and travel substantially normal to the direction of travel of the tube 44. A static electrical charge dissipating or removalmeans 223 may be employed to remove any static electricity carried by the spills 52 to facilitate handling them during subsequent operations.

Spacing Gate The spacing gate'60 is in a lowered position relative to the conveyor 58 to collect the selected predetermined number of spills for eventual transmission to the bundling assembly 62. In accomplishing this, the gate '60includes a lower brush end 224, the bristles of-which air cylinder 230 in timed relation so that a selected predetermined number of spills 52 for bundling is permitted to pass through the open gate on the conveyor 58. The operation of the cylinder 230 is taken off of the timing cams 196 of programmer 190. The timing permits the gate 60 to be in its'lowered position sufficiently to collect the spills 52 and then to be raised and subsequently lowered to permit the predetermined number of spills 52. topass through the gate to the bundling assembly 62. As explained earlier, this timing or count is taken off of the rotation of the knife 50.

In accordance with a successful embodiment of the invention, spills are permitted to be collected and passed through the gate 60 for eventual bundling.

Bundling Assembly The bundling assembly 62 receives the predetermined number of spills 52 passed through the gate 60 and bundles them for banding by the banding assembly 64. The bundling assembly 62 comprises a bundling drum 234 which may comprise any number of bundling sure the properplacement'and collection of thespills 52 in the receiving-pockets 236, a bundle plunger 240 travels in the chute 238 after 'the predetermined number of spills. has been discharged by the conveyor .58. The plunger 240 extends'from an air cylinder242, the actuation of which is controlled by the timing cams 198 of the programmer 190. In the manner to 'be described in detail shortly, a length of banding material 244 extends at the bottom of the chute 238 across the opening into the uppermost pocket 236 for reception 'of the predetermined number of spills discharged by the conveyor 58. Upon actuation of the air' cylinder 242 upon reception of a signal from the timing cam 198a following the collection of the predetermined number of spills 52,- the plunger 240 is driven downwardly into the collected spills to urge the spills together with the'length of banding material 244into the pocket 236. Thereafter, the spills with the length of banding material 244- is moved upon indexing of thedrum 234 to permit another spill receiving pocket to be moved to a spill collecting position at the lower end of the chute 238, and the plunger 240 is retracted by a signal from timing cam 19%.

Banding Assembly The banding assembly 64 furnishes the selected length of handing material 244 for banding about the bundled predetermined number of spills contained in the spill receiving pocket 236. The length of the banding material .244 is supplied from a web extending from -a roll 2460f banding material. The'web isintermittently driven to remove banding material from the roll 246 bymeans of a driven-roll 248 and a downwardly biased roll 250/The driven roll 248 takes its driveas engagement with a fixed support266 with the leading end of the band interposed therebetween. The plunger 265 isspring biased and is lowered by actuation of the air cylinder 268 which is coupled with the timing cam 200.- After the band 244 is cut and while the plunger 265 is in its lowered band engaging position, the plunger 240 drives the collected predetermined number of spills downwardly into the receiving pocket 236 together with the band 244. The'trailing end of the band 244 "is consequently draw'n forwardly away from the cutting knife 254. Thereafter, the hold down plunger 265 is retracted upon deactuation of the air cylinder-268. f i v The one revolution clutch 252 is then actuated upon receipt of signal from the one cycle switch to index the bundle drum 234 to present a new spill receiving pocket 236. At the same time, the band drive roll248 is actuated to feed the desired length of web 244 across the spill receiving pocket 236 now in the spill receiving position.

As the bundle of spills and partially encased band 244 traverses its movement to the next indexed position of the bundled drum, the leading end of the band 244 is folded across the opening of the pocket 236 over the contained spills 52. The peripheral leading edge and trailingedge of the band 244 are placed in contact withone another. When the next indexing position of the air cylinder 264, the yoke 262 is driven upwardly to cause rotation of the shaft 258 and consequent movement of the movable knife 254 downwardly. The yoke 262 immediately returns to-its initial position upon deenergization of the air cylinder 26.4. The air cylinder 264 is actuated upon receipt of signals from the timing cams 202 of programmer190. The cutting of the length v 244 banding material to form a band for the bundle of spills is accomplished slightly before the downward actuation of plunger 240. Essentially simultaneously with the actuation of air cylinder 264, the leading end of the band 244 is held by the movement of plunger 265 into the bundle drum is reached, the-band heat seal 270 is lowered into the engaged peripheral edges of the band to heat seal them together. The heat seal 270 is then retracted. The movement of the'heat seal 27 0 is caused .by the air cylinder 272, the actuation of. which is taken off the timingcams 204. The'banded bundle of spills is then discharged from the bundle drum 234 when the drum indexes once again.

Summary I With specific reference to FIGS. 3 and 4, the formation of banded bundled spills from a tube cigarette paper having a tipping part thereon for the manufacture of filter-tip cigarettes as wellas the apparatus accomplishing this-operation may be summarized as follows. The web 36 of cigarette paper having spaced tipping parts 40 thereof is directed from the roll 34 through the photocell arrangement 42 for assuring proper registration of the cut made by the knife assembly 50 with the tipping part 40. The web 36 is transformed into a sealed tube 44 at the tube forming station 46 by initially forming the web 36 into a substantially U-shaped cross-sectional configuration, applying glue to the inner face of onc'of the marginal side'edges and then sealing the seam provided by the overlapped marginal side edges when placed in contact with one another. The formed sealed tube 44 is then flattened by the pressure roller assembly 48. The flattened tube passes onto the ledger 156 which cooperates with the knife assembly 50 in effecting the desired cutting of the flattened tube along essentially the center of the tipping part 40 and the center of the cigarette paper between such tipping parts 40. Inasmuch as the tube 44 is traveling at relatively high speeds, the U shaped channel 158

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Klassifizierungen
US-Klassifikation53/399, 53/513, 131/94, 53/586, 493/11, 493/43, 493/4, 53/148, 53/435, 131/73, 53/443
Internationale KlassifikationA24C5/46, A24C5/00
UnternehmensklassifikationA24C5/46
Europäische KlassifikationA24C5/46