Suche Bilder Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive Mehr »
Anmelden
Nutzer von Screenreadern: Klicke auf diesen Link, um die Bedienungshilfen zu aktivieren. Dieser Modus bietet die gleichen Grundfunktionen, funktioniert aber besser mit deinem Reader.

Patentsuche

  1. Erweiterte Patentsuche
VeröffentlichungsnummerUS4401976 A
PublikationstypErteilung
AnmeldenummerUS 06/225,000
Veröffentlichungsdatum30. Aug. 1983
Eingetragen14. Jan. 1981
Prioritätsdatum16. Jan. 1980
GebührenstatusVerfallen
Auch veröffentlicht unterDE3001452A1, EP0032593A2, EP0032593A3
Veröffentlichungsnummer06225000, 225000, US 4401976 A, US 4401976A, US-A-4401976, US4401976 A, US4401976A
ErfinderHans-Gunther Stadelmayr
Ursprünglich BevollmächtigterStadelmayr Hans G
Zitat exportierenBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Externe Links: USPTO, USPTO-Zuordnung, Espacenet
Multiple sensor interconnected alarm system responsive to different variables
US 4401976 A
Zusammenfassung
An alarm, safeguarding and monitoring system for a room zone includes a plurality of sensors disposed at different positions and responsive to different physical phenomena, such as an ultrasonic sensor, an infrared sensor and a microwave sensor. The sensor outputs are individually coupled to majority decision, central processing unit and alarm generator circuits by a plurality of redundant signal links to minimize malfunction in the event of disruption or tampering.
Bilder(2)
Previous page
Next page
Ansprüche(16)
I claim:
1. Alarm, safeguarding and monitoring system having a plurality of sensors in one room, comprising: at least three sensors which respond to physical phenomena of a different nature which always occur in every alarm event, said sensors being disposed to cover the same monitoring zone, and means responsive to output signals from said sensors for generating an alarm signal according to the majority principle.
2. Alarm, safeguarding and monitoring system according to claim 1, wherein three sensors respond to three different physical phenomena.
3. Alarm, safeguarding and monitoring system, according to claim 2, wherein at least two of the sensors work according to the Doppler principle and are disposed angularly with respect to one another.
4. Alarm, safeguarding and monitoring system according to claim 3, wherein the sensors working according to the Doppler principle are disposed orthogonally with respect to one another.
5. Alarm, safeguarding and monitoring system according to claim 3, wherein the outputs of the individual sensors working according to the Doppler principle are fed to an OR circuit, whose output is coupled to said alarm signal generating means.
6. Alarm, safeguarding and monitoring system according to claim 3, wherein different types of sensors are integrated in one casing.
7. Alarm, safeguarding and monitoring system according to claim 3, wherein individual signal connections between different functional groups have at least three signal paths which are independent of one another and whose outputs are processed by a majority logic circuit.
8. Alarm, safeguarding and monitoring system according to claim 3, wherein an activate/deactivate circuit has at least two signal paths which are independent of one another.
9. Alarm, safeguarding and monitoring system according to claim 3, wherein an on/off circuit and peripheral monitoring and actuating units are not connected via any system wiring, so that even if these units are located this does not lead to the location or destruction of a central processing unit.
10. Alarm, safeguarding and monitoring system according to claim 9, wherein coding of the central processing unit ensues via an external unit which has no direct connecting path to the central processing unit.
11. Alarm, safeguarding and monitoring system according to claim 10, wherein in the case of permanent connection leads to on/off switches, monitoring and actuating units, a galvanic interruption is inserted into the connection leads.
12. Alarm, safeguarding and monitoring system according to claim 11, wherein the galvanic interruption is effected via a relay circuit.
13. Alarm, safeguarding and monitoring system according to claim 2, wherein two ultrasonic sensors and one infrared sensor are provided.
14. Alarm, safeguarding and monitoring system according to claim 2, wherein two microwave sensors and one infrared sensor are provided.
15. Alarm, safeguarding and monitoring system according to claim 2, wherein two sensor pairs disposed angularly to one another, each pair comprising a microwave sensor and an ultrasonic sensor, and one infrared sensor are provided.
16. Alarm, safeguarding and monitoring system according to claim 15, wherein the infrared sensor is disposed separate from the sensor pairs.
Beschreibung

The invention relates to an alarm, safeguarding and monitoring system having a plurality of sensors and located in one room.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

From U.S. Pat. No. 3,801,978 a monitoring or alarm system is known having two sensors located in one room and working according to the Doppler principle, said sensors responding to at least two physical phenomena of different nature but occurring inevitably in every event of alarm, and covering the same monitoring zone. An increased degree of safety is achieved with this known system in comparison to conventional commercial alarm systems. But in spite of this there is still a considerable susceptibility to sabotage and a high error rate.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The invention therefore provides an alarm, safeguarding and monitoring system wherein the known cases of susceptibility to trouble, such as, e.g., failure to respond, false alarms and possibilities of sabotage are almost completely excluded. According to the invention at least three sensors are provided which respond to different physical phenomena that occur inevitably in every alarm situation, or else respond to the same physical phenomena in a different way, or in two or more different ways, said sensors covering the same monitoring zone, and working together according to the majority principle. Accordingly, an alarm is only set off if more than half of all the sensors or sensor pairs working together according to the Doppler principle give an alarm signal to the transmission channel or channels in the direction of the central processing unit. This ensures that the effectiveness of the system is not impaired by the failure of one of the sensors or by an influence on or bypassing of the same.

According to a preferred embodiment, three or more sensors are employed which respond to three or more different physical phenomena. It is especially advantageous if at least two of the sensors work according to the Doppler principle and if these are disposed angularly to one another--an orthogonal arrangement produces as a rule the best results.

It is useful to have two ultrasonic sensors and one infrared sensor, or two microwave sensors and one infrared sensor. A further increased degree of monitoring precision can be obtained if, according to a further development of this arrangement, one provides two microwave-ultrasonic sensor pairs disposed angularly to one another and one infrared sensor which is preferably located separate from the sensor pairs.

As far as linkage of the sensors is concerned, it is expedient if the individual sensors acting according to the Doppler principle are linked via an AND circuit. It is advantageous if a sensor pair working according to the Doppler principle, of which pair the individual sensors are connected in an OR circuit, is linked with another sensor and/or another sensor pair working according to the Doppler principle, whose individual sensors are connected in OR circuit, by means of an AND circuit.

Regarding the signal connections, it is expedient to provide between different functional groups at least two signal paths which are independent of one another and which interact advantageously according to lateral inhibition. The term lateral inhibition, which was coined by Nobel prize winner von Bekesy, means the mutual inhibition of parallel members, as has also come into use in the field of communication engineering.

In the case of endangered signal connections between different functional groups, it is expedient that these signal connections have at least three signal paths which are independent of one another and which interact via a majority logic in the sense mentioned above.

If the system is to be portable, it is advisable to design the signal paths by means of the combined use of the mains, radio and independent wiring.

The safety of the system can be further improved by providing at the end of each signal path a circuit which responds to interferences in said signal path and which generates an alarm.

The independent signal paths can be designed in simple manner from devices for the utilization of several different signal transmission frequency band widths or different pulse sequences on the same medium. It is also useful if a continuous signal is transmitted via radio and monitored to indicate inoperativeness, and whose coded modulated disturbance signal sets off an alarm.

It is further advisable to have the mains connected to the alarm system or automatic information transmission system so that if there is a power failure a general or special alarm, which differs from the main alarm, is set off for each individual unit of the entire system.

In the case of exposed operational blocks it is advisable to have a separate protection against sabotage which can be effected by means of mechanical vibration signalizers with a delay circuit.

Especially sensitive areas of the alarm system are the activate/deactivate circuit or on/off circuit, since these must be located outside the monitored region. Here too it is advisable to have at least two signal paths which are independent of one another, and if possible not to use any special connection wiring, so that even if the on/off switch, peripheral monitoring or actuating units are located this does not lead to location of the central processing unit or to its destruction by a heavy current. Similar considerations apply also for the coding of the central processing unit, which coding ensues expediently via an external unit which has no direct connecting path to the central processing unit. In the case of already-existing systems or in cases where permanent connection leads are unavoidable, it is a good idea to insert a galvanic interruption which can be expediently effected by means of a relay circuit. With regard to the signal paths it is finally also advisable if each individual channel further signalizes, by means of a special device, any disturbances in any other channel.

Protective coincidence circuits prevent different response times of the sensors, different transfer and transmission times from different channels and different processing times of any intermediate elements from endangering the coincidence of the alarm signals, which could under certain conditions result in no alarm being generated even if there is cause for an alarm.

If more than three sensors are used in the same room area, and this applies in particular for an even number of sensors, it is advantageous with respect to the majority evaluation to count one pair of individual sensors as a single unit. This can also ensue, however, by means of some other majority or minority protection.

The installation of the system is facilitated in that different types of sensors are integrated into one casing.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 shows a block diagram of an alarm, safeguarding and monitoring system where different design possibilities have been realized, and

FIG. 2 shows an example of a system in which two pairs of sensors working according to the Doppler principle are provided, including various possibilities for linking the individual sensors--in simplified schematic form.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

In the block diagram of FIG. 1 the dashed frame 1 designates a monitoring zone, e.g. a room. In the monitoring zone 1 there are four sensors 2-5, of which sensor 2 is an ultrasonic sensor, sensors 3 and 4 infrared sensors and sensor 5 a microwave sensor. The sensors are each connected via three separate transmission channels K1-K3 to signalizers 6-9. Channels K1-K3 can be part of an already existing wiring system, a wiring network installed especially for the alarm system, or a radio transmission path. The different types of lines show that the three channels K1, K2 and K3 represent in each case separate transmission paths. In the signalizers 6, 7 and 9 there is a lateral inhibition member--designated in each case LI--which effects the mutual monitoring of the channels leading to these signalizers. In the channels leading to signalizer 8, however, there is a majority circuit 10--designated M--which evaluates according to the majority principle the signals passed through the corresponding channels K1, K2 and K3 and subsequently triggers signalizer 8 via a channel K4.

Signalizer 8 and the majority circuit 10 are accommodated in a common housing 11, indicated by a dot-dash line, which is additionally safeguarded against sabotage by means of a mechanical vibration signalizer not shown in detail.

From signalizers 6, 7 and 8 three separate channels K1', K2' and K3' lead to a majority circuit 12, to which a further channel K5 from signalizer 9 also leads. In the majority circuit 12, as shown by reference characters 12a, 12b and 12c, the signals transmitted via the leads K1', K2' and K3' are first of all evaluated according to the majority principle, according to which the overall evaluation ensues, i.e. a check is made as to whether the majority of the signalizers 6-9 have signalled an alarm situation.

Reference character 13 indicates that signalizer 9 and the majority circuit 12 are integrated in a unitary housing, which may be additionally safeguarded, and also that signalizer 9 is given preference with respect to each of the other signalizers 6-8 for the majority evaluation. (Instead of a preference, which corresponds to a majority protection, a discrimination could be provided for this signalizer which would correspond to that of a minority protection.)

From the majority circuit 12 three independent channels K6, K7 and K8 lead to the evaluation unit 14, which can e.g. be the central processing unit. The channels K6 to K8 are monitored by means of a lateral inhibition circuit 15 in the central processing unit 14. From the central processing unit 14 channels K9, K10 and K11 lead to different alarm generators 16-19, the mutual channel monitoring in alarm generators 16 and 18 being effected by a lateral inhibition member 16a, 18a and in alarm generators 17 and 19 by majority circuits 17b and 19b.

The system is switched on and off by means of an activate/deactivate circuit S/US 20, which is installed separate from the central processing unit and which is connected to the latter via independent channels K12-K14. The channels K12-K14 lead first to a transmitter 21, which then controls the central processing unit 14 via channels K12'-K14'. This measure guarantees that the central processing unit cannot be located from the on-and-off unit 20, and also cannot be destroyed.

Also interacting with the central processing unit 14 is a coder 22, which is connected via channels K15, K16, K17 and perhaps a majority circuit 23 to a relay station 24 that acts via a channel K18 on the central processing unit. The relay station 24 constitutes a galvanic interruption between the coder 22 and the central processing unit 14, and thus likewise prevents any possible destruction originating from the coder.

In the operating condition shown in FIG. 1 sensors 4 and 5 are excited, as is indicated by a small asterisk in the interior of each box. Sensors 2 and 3, on the other hand, are not excited. Sensors 4 and 5 thus send via their associated channels K1-K3 signals to the majority circuit 10 and signalizer 9 respectively; in the case shown the channel K1 between sensor 4 and the majority circuit 10 is destroyed. This is shown in the drawing by the absence of a corresponding arrow in this channel, while the arrows in the other channels show that a signal is being transmitted. Via channel K4 majority circuit 10 triggers signalizer 8, which for its part, via channels K1' and K2', passes on the alarm signal to majority circuit 12, Channel K3' is in this case likewise disturbed and inoperable, for reasons not explained in more detail. Signalizer 9 also passes on a signal to majority circuit 12, via channel K5. The majority circuit 12 now establishes that no signal has been delivered by the internal majority circuits 12a and 12b but that there is a corresponding signal from internal majority circuit 12c and likewise from signalizer 9 via channel K5. Since signalizer 9 is preferred by means of circuit 13, the majority circuit 12 decides that there is an alarm condition and passes on this decision via channels K6-K8 to the central processing unit 14, which, via channels K9-K11, triggers the alarm generators 16-19. A disturbance in transmission channel K10 leading to alarm generator 16 and in transmission channel K11 leading to alarm generator 19 has no effect, since the lateral inhibition circuit 16a and majority circuit 19b still ascertain with certainty that there is a valid alarm.

FIG. 2 shows schematically the arrangement and linkage of a plurality of sensors disposed to monitor a zone or area 25, such as a room.

These constitute two pairs of sensors based on the Doppler principle, the first pair being accommodated in a common casing 26 and comprising an ultrasonic sensor 27 and a microwave sensor 28, and the second pair, comprising an ultrasonic sensor 29 and a microwave sensor 30, being disposed separate from one another. With regard to their transmitting and receiving directions, the sensor pairs formed by sensors 27, 28 and 29, 30 are disposed orthogonally to one another. Between the two pairs of sensors and oblique to them is an infrared sensor 31. The sensors are connected with one another by AND or OR circuits, as shown by the corresponding symbols in FIG. 2. This means that the ultrasonic sensor 27 and the microwave sensor 28 of the first sensor pair are connected with one another in an AND circuit. The same applies for the microwave sensor 30 and the IR sensor 31, the ultrasonic sensor 29 and the IR sensor 31, the microwave sensor 28 and the IR sensor 31 as well as the microwave sensor 30 and the ultrasonic sensor 29, and the ultrasonic sensor 27 and the IR sensor 31.

The linkage between the microwave sensor 30 and the ultrasonic sensor 27 ensues via an OR circuit. The linkage between the ultrasonic sensor 29 and the microwave sensor 28 likewise ensues via an OR circuit. Alternatively, the outputs of the sensors 30, 28 and 29, 27 may also be fed to OR circuits. Details of the wiring and the interconnection with the central processing unit have not been shown for reasons of clarity.

The sensor types described in the Figures are merely examples; besides the ultrasonic sensors, microwave sensors and infrared sensors mentioned one can naturally also employ capacitive signalizers, mechanical vibration signalizers, broken glass sensors, video cameras, reed and double reed contacts etc. The alarm generators can be optical and acoustic devices, such as flash signals and sirens, or telephone or radio dialling devices.

Patentzitate
Zitiertes PatentEingetragen Veröffentlichungsdatum Antragsteller Titel
US3541539 *29. Nov. 196817. Nov. 1970Us Air ForceIntegrated fire and overheat detection system for manned flight vehicles
US3725888 *5. Apr. 19713. Apr. 1973Pyrotector IncDetector system
US3801978 *20. Juli 19722. Apr. 1974E Systems IncUltrasonic-microwave doppler intrusion alarm system
US3846778 *21. Juni 19735. Nov. 1974Aerospace ResCombined ultrasonic and electromagnetic intrusion alarm system
JPS5026198A * Titel nicht verfügbar
Referenziert von
Zitiert von PatentEingetragen Veröffentlichungsdatum Antragsteller Titel
US4611197 *19. Febr. 19859. Sept. 1986Sansky Michael JMalfunction-detecting status monitoring system
US4625199 *14. Jan. 198525. Nov. 1986American District Telegraph CompanyCombination intrusion detector system having correlated ultrasonic and microwave detection sub-systems
US4710750 *5. Aug. 19861. Dez. 1987C & K Systems, Inc.Fault detecting intrusion detection device
US4719973 *25. Nov. 198619. Jan. 1988Graviner LimitedFire and explosion detection and suppression
US4783801 *5. Dez. 19848. Nov. 1988Gao Gesellschaft Fur Automation Und Organisation MbhApparatus for protecting secret information
US4833450 *15. Apr. 198823. Mai 1989Napco Security Systems, Inc.Fault detection in combination intrusion detection systems
US4850018 *1. Juli 198618. Juli 1989Baker Industries, Inc.Security system with enhanced protection against compromising
US4857912 *27. Juli 198815. Aug. 1989The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyIntelligent security assessment system
US4891574 *20. Dez. 19882. Jan. 1990Mitchell Instruments Ltd.Hygrometer with plural measuring bones and redundancy system circuit
US4942384 *31. März 198917. Juli 1990Matsushita Electric Works, Ltd.Composite type crime preventive sensor
US4977391 *18. Dez. 198911. Dez. 1990Equipement Industriel NormandSafety device for a distributor member connected to a distributed product totalizing element
US4998094 *5. Apr. 19895. März 1991Telefunken Electronic GmbhSafeguard device
US5058032 *23. Okt. 198915. Okt. 1991Autotrol CorporationApparatus and method for monitoring a water treatment system
US5122628 *25. Mai 199016. Juni 1992Fike CorporationSudden pressure rise detector
US5144661 *11. Febr. 19911. Sept. 1992Robert ShamoshSecurity protection system and method
US5181010 *13. Febr. 199119. Jan. 1993Chick James SAutomotive security system with discrimination between tampering and attack
US5236049 *24. Dez. 199117. Aug. 1993Securite Polygon Inc.Fire emergency, sprinkling control system and method thereof
US5239459 *5. Febr. 199024. Aug. 1993General Research CorporationAutomated assessment processor for physical security system
US5257007 *1. Okt. 199126. Okt. 1993M-Tec CorporationPortable security system
US5331308 *30. Juli 199219. Juli 1994Napco Security Systems, Inc.Automatically adjustable and self-testing dual technology intrusion detection system for minimizing false alarms
US5398057 *12. Jan. 199314. März 1995Tapp; Hollis M.Security and surveillance system
US5473311 *16. Sept. 19945. Dez. 1995C&K Systems, Inc.Method and apparatus to distinguish human intruder and animal intruder
US5475365 *2. Dez. 199412. Dez. 1995C & K Systems, Inc.Methods and apparatus for intrusion detection having improved immunity to false alarms
US5493273 *28. Sept. 199320. Febr. 1996The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavySystem for detecting perturbations in an environment using temporal sensor data
US5510765 *7. Jan. 199323. Apr. 1996Ford Motor CompanyMotor vehicle security sensor system
US5517429 *8. Mai 199214. Mai 1996Harrison; Dana C.Intelligent area monitoring system
US5576972 *28. März 199519. Nov. 1996Harrison; Dana C.Intelligent area monitoring system
US5581236 *1. Juli 19943. Dez. 1996C & K Systems, Inc.Methods and apparatus for intrusion detection having improved immunity to false alarms
US5657076 *14. März 199512. Aug. 1997Tapp; Hollis M.Security and surveillance system
US5684458 *26. Febr. 19964. Nov. 1997Napco Security Systems, Inc.Microwave sensor with adjustable sampling frequency based on environmental conditions
US5986357 *4. Febr. 199716. Nov. 1999Mytech CorporationOccupancy sensor and method of operating same
US6078253 *15. Okt. 199720. Juni 2000Mytech CorporationOccupancy sensor and method of operating same
US63575313. Aug. 200019. März 2002Systems Fireflex Inc.Virtual accelerator for detecting an alarm condition within a pressurized gas sprinkler system and method thereof
US641520526. Aug. 19992. Juli 2002Mytech CorporationOccupancy sensor and method of operating same
US653857022. Juni 200025. März 2003Honeywell InternationalGlass-break detector and method of alarm discrimination
US6683432 *11. Sept. 200227. Jan. 2004Eigenpoint CompanySafety circuit with automatic recovery
US675995411. Sept. 20006. Juli 2004Hubbell IncorporatedMulti-dimensional vector-based occupancy sensor and method of operating same
US681923920. Aug. 200216. Nov. 2004Victoria J. BinghamLighting security system
US75364574. Dez. 200619. Mai 2009Drivecam, Inc.System and method for wireless delivery of event data
US76598278. Mai 20069. Febr. 2010Drivecam, Inc.System and method for taking risk out of driving
US76802837. Febr. 200516. März 2010Honeywell International Inc.Method and system for detecting a predetermined sound event such as the sound of breaking glass
US776118628. Jan. 200820. Juli 2010Tlc Integration, LlcAutomated lighting and building control system
US78044264. Dez. 200628. Sept. 2010Drivecam, Inc.System and method for selective review of event data
US7830750 *17. Sept. 20079. Nov. 2010Honeywell International Inc.Apparatus and method for calibrating an acoustic detection system
US80443361. Febr. 200625. Okt. 2011Pyronix LimitedDetector and optical system
US81644372. Febr. 200624. Apr. 2012Pyronix LimitedDetection apparatus
US83147088. Mai 200620. Nov. 2012Drivecam, Inc.System and method for reducing driving risk with foresight
US837356728. Aug. 200612. Febr. 2013Drivecam, Inc.System and method for identifying non-event profiles
US838992423. Sept. 20115. März 2013Pyronix LimitedDetector and optical system
US88682889. Nov. 200621. Okt. 2014Smartdrive Systems, Inc.Vehicle exception event management systems
US88802794. Jan. 20134. Nov. 2014Smartdrive Systems, Inc.Memory management in event recording systems
US889231021. Febr. 201418. Nov. 2014Smartdrive Systems, Inc.System and method to detect execution of driving maneuvers
US89899597. Nov. 200624. März 2015Smartdrive Systems, Inc.Vehicle operator performance history recording, scoring and reporting systems
US899624016. März 200631. März 2015Smartdrive Systems, Inc.Vehicle event recorders with integrated web server
US918367925. Sept. 201310. Nov. 2015Smartdrive Systems, Inc.Distributed vehicle event recorder systems having a portable memory data transfer system
US920184216. März 20061. Dez. 2015Smartdrive Systems, Inc.Vehicle event recorder systems and networks having integrated cellular wireless communications systems
US92081292. Aug. 20138. Dez. 2015Smartdrive Systems, Inc.Vehicle event recorder systems and networks having integrated cellular wireless communications systems
US92260043. Nov. 201429. Dez. 2015Smartdrive Systems, Inc.Memory management in event recording systems
US940206027. Febr. 201526. Juli 2016Smartdrive Systems, Inc.Vehicle event recorders with integrated web server
US947202917. Nov. 201518. Okt. 2016Smartdrive Systems, Inc.Vehicle event recorder systems and networks having integrated cellular wireless communications systems
US950187816. Okt. 201322. Nov. 2016Smartdrive Systems, Inc.Vehicle event playback apparatus and methods
US954588113. Juli 201517. Jan. 2017Smartdrive Systems, Inc.Vehicle event recorder systems and networks having integrated cellular wireless communications systems
US955408010. Febr. 201424. Jan. 2017Smartdrive Systems, Inc.Power management systems for automotive video event recorders
US956691030. Okt. 201514. Febr. 2017Smartdrive Systems, Inc.Vehicle event recorder systems and networks having integrated cellular wireless communications systems
US959437115. Sept. 201414. März 2017Smartdrive Systems, Inc.System and method to detect execution of driving maneuvers
US961095511. Nov. 20134. Apr. 2017Smartdrive Systems, Inc.Vehicle fuel consumption monitor and feedback systems
US96333188. Dez. 200625. Apr. 2017Smartdrive Systems, Inc.Vehicle event recorder systems
US966312728. Okt. 201430. Mai 2017Smartdrive Systems, Inc.Rail vehicle event detection and recording system
US96794246. Nov. 201513. Juni 2017Smartdrive Systems, Inc.Distributed vehicle event recorder systems having a portable memory data transfer system
US969119517. Okt. 201627. Juni 2017Smartdrive Systems, Inc.Vehicle event recorder systems and networks having integrated cellular wireless communications systems
US972822810. Aug. 20128. Aug. 2017Smartdrive Systems, Inc.Vehicle event playback apparatus and methods
US973815617. Okt. 201422. Aug. 2017Smartdrive Systems, Inc.Vehicle exception event management systems
US976106730. Okt. 201412. Sept. 2017Smartdrive Systems, Inc.Vehicle operator performance history recording, scoring and reporting systems
US20030050735 *11. Sept. 200213. März 2003Michael GriffisSafety circuit with automatic recovery
US20050206515 *22. März 200422. Sept. 2005Alexander PakhomovSystems for protection against intruders
US20060177071 *7. Febr. 200510. Aug. 2006Honeywell International, Inc.Method and system for detecting a predetermined sound event such as the sound of breaking glass
US20070260361 *4. Dez. 20068. Nov. 2007Drivecam, Inc.System and Method for Selective Review of Event Data
US20070260363 *4. Dez. 20068. Nov. 2007Drivecam, Inc.System and Method for Wireless Delivery of Event Data
US20070268158 *9. Mai 200622. Nov. 2007Drivecam, Inc.System and Method for Reducing Driving Risk With Insight
US20080272281 *1. Febr. 20066. Nov. 2008Pyronix LimitedDetector and Optical System
US20090073803 *17. Sept. 200719. März 2009Honeywell International, Inc.Apparatus and method for calibrating an acoustic detection system
US20090149973 *28. Jan. 200811. Juni 2009Tlc Integration, LlcAutomated lighting and building control system
US20090189764 *28. Jan. 200830. Juli 2009Tlc Integration, LlcUniversal occupancy adapter
US20110169629 *2. Febr. 200614. Juli 2011Pyronix LimitedDetection Apparatus
USRE33824 *30. Okt. 198918. Febr. 1992 Fault detecting intrusion detection device
DE3911180A1 *6. Apr. 198919. Okt. 1989Matsushita Electric Works LtdMeldevorrichtung zur verhuetung von straftaten mittels eines verbund-sensorsystems
EP0259015A2 *5. Aug. 19879. März 1988C & K Systems, Inc.Fault-detecting intrusion detection device
EP0259015A3 *5. Aug. 19876. Juli 1988C & K Systems, Inc.Fault-detecting intrusion detection device
EP0919973A2 *23. Okt. 19982. Juni 1999Meta System S.p.A.Double technology combined alarm system with a contained and controlled consumption
EP0919973A3 *23. Okt. 199815. Sept. 1999Meta System S.p.A.Double technology combined alarm system with a contained and controlled consumption
WO2006107203A1 *3. Apr. 200612. Okt. 2006General Electric CompanyIntrusion detector
Klassifizierungen
US-Klassifikation340/522, 340/508, 367/94, 340/554, 340/541
Internationale KlassifikationG08B29/04, G08B13/19, G08B23/00, G08B25/00, G08B29/16, G08B13/00, G08B29/18, G08B13/16
UnternehmensklassifikationG08B13/19, G08B29/16, G08B29/046, G08B13/00, G08B29/183
Europäische KlassifikationG08B29/18D, G08B13/00, G08B29/04B, G08B13/19, G08B29/16
Juristische Ereignisse
DatumCodeEreignisBeschreibung
27. Febr. 1987FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
2. Apr. 1991REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
1. Sept. 1991LAPSLapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
12. Nov. 1991FPExpired due to failure to pay maintenance fee
Effective date: 19910825